Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘American Woodcock’

Photographing birds is fun and it’s a great way to create wonderful memories of special birds and birding trips. It’s also a good way to learn more about birds. I’m not an expert, but I would like to share what I’ve learned. I just use a “point-and-shoot” camera, but these basics also apply to DSLR cameras.

I got my current camera (a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150) about two years ago and I quickly learned that I rarely got good photographs with auto mode. I switched to program mode so that I could set the focus to a single area. This is probably the single most important thing to do – put your camera in any mode other than auto and use a single focus area. That’s all I did until recently and I got nice photographs of easy birds under good conditions.

American Woodcock. Program mode. Camera stabilized on the boardwalk railing. Image cropped, but no other editing.

American Woodcock. Program mode. Camera stabilized on the boardwalk railing. Image cropped, but no other editing.

Recently, I’ve become interested in improving my skills, so I had photography lessons with Tom Dunkerton  at Merritt Island NWR on my last trip to Florida. Tom set me in the right direction, made it fun and easy, and gave me confidence. I also found some great online tutorials on bird photography and bought a book. I’ll give links to these resources at the end of this post.

Green Heron. My favorite photo taken the day after my lessons with Tom Dunkerton.

Green Heron. My favorite photo taken the day after my lessons with Tom Dunkerton.

The first thing to work on is getting sharp, well-exposed images. As mentioned above, use a single focus area. On most cameras you can control the position of the focus area (it doesn’t have to be in the center of the image) and the size of the area. Focus on the bird’s eye. If the eye is in focus, the photo will generally be pleasing. Aperture mode is usually recommended for photographing birds. A wide aperture (low number) will increase the shutter speed, helping prevent blur caused by movement of the subject. It will also help to get a sharp image of the bird, but keep the background softly out of focus. Unless you are trying to create a shot showing bird habitat, a sharply focused background is distracting.

Red-bellied Woodpecker in my backyard. The light in the bird's eye makes this photo work.

Red-bellied Woodpecker in my backyard. The light in the bird’s eye makes this photo work.

It is also important to hold the camera as still as possible. Experts recommend using the electronic viewfinder rather than the LCD screen. That allows you to use your body to stabilize the camera. I’ve never been able to do that, so I put the camera strap around my neck and hold the camera away from my body so that the strap is tight. I hold my left hand under the camera to add additional stability and press the shutter with my right hand. Even better than hand-holding the camera is using a tripod, monopod, or some other stationary object to support the camera. Experiment – see what works for you.

Three things affect exposure – aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. A good basic ISO setting is 400. However, if you are shooting in low light, you may want to increase the ISO. When using aperture mode, the camera will automatically set the shutter speed. This works fine for most birds with good lighting conditions. But, white birds and very dark birds are more challenging. You may also need to make some adjustments if the light is not ideal. The easiest way to make adjustments is to use exposure compensation. To do this effectively, set your camera to display a histogram and learn to read it. It’s actually very easy and provides instant feedback on your exposure. It simply displays the tones in the image, usually from dark on the left to the lightest tones on the right. The goal is to keep the graph within the scale, as evenly distributed from left to right as possible, but not “hitting the wall” on either end. If the graph goes off the left end, the photo will be underexposed and details lost in the shadows. If it goes off the right end, some areas of the photo will be pure white and no post-processing can recover the blown highlights.  If the graph is too far to the left, increase the exposure compensation.  If it’s too far to the right, decrease the exposure compensation.

There is much more to learn about photography, but these basics will go a long way towards helping you get some nice photos that will add to your enjoyment of birds.

This Snowy Egret was a white bird with a dark background. An exposure compensation of -1 kept the details in the white feathers.

This Snowy Egret was a white bird with a dark background. An exposure compensation of -1 kept the details in the white feathers.

Here are a few more miscellaneous tips that I’ve recently learned.

  • Study your bad photos to determine what went wrong. Also, study your good photos to see what went right.  Use the EXIF data embedded in each photo to see the settings you used and how they affected the image.
  • Try turning off “image stabilization” in good light. I was amazed, but my images were sharper after I turned this setting to “off.”
  • Use burst mode. Any camera movement caused by pressing the shutter won’t be evident in the second and subsequent photos. It may also help you get the bird in a more pleasing position if it moves.
  • Take lots of photos. It’s not film. It’s free to shoot photos with a digital camera.
  • Use photo-editing software. Sure, you want to capture the best image that you can, but don’t be afraid to improve it with a little editing.
Pine Warbler (female). Even a simple image can be pleasing. This photo works because the background is out of focus.

Pine Warbler (female). Even a simple image can be pleasing. This photo works because the background is out of focus.

A few resources for bird photography:

  • The user manual for your camera.
  • Bird Photography Tutorials from Mike Atkinson.
  • Many excellent books on digital photography are available. I just bought The Beginner’s Photography Guide ($15.18 from Amazon) and I’m finding it to be extremely helpful.
  • Ask for help.  We have several skilled photographers in Forsyth County who are willing to answer questions, offer suggestions, and provide additional help.

Below is an example of learning more about birds through photography. I photographed this male Common Merganser in California a couple of years ago. When I looked at the photo, I was fascinated by the pattern on the breast. I never would have noticed or remembered this detail from just looking at the bird with my binoculars. Since then, experiences like this have been repeated many times.

Common Merganser (male)

Common Merganser (male)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Magee Marsh boardwalk entrance

Magee Marsh boardwalk entrance

Disneyland for Birders – that is how I heard someone refer to Magee Marsh on the first day. It’s a perfect characterization of this world-famous birding hot spot. It not only provides spectacular eye-level views of birds, but it has that Disney feeling of wholesome, clean, friendly fun.

The Great Black Swamp once covered 1,500 square miles of northwestern Ohio extending from Port Clinton to Fort Wayne, Indiana.  The vast network of forests, wetlands, and grasslands provided vital stopover habitat where tired and hungry neotropical songbirds could rest and refuel before continuing their migration.  Today, most of the area has been drained for agriculture; only 10 percent of Ohio’s original wetlands are left.  Magee Marsh is one of the few remaining remnants of the Great Black Swamp.  Its wooded beach ridges between the marsh and the southern shore of Lake Erie are especially important as the last stop for migrating birds reluctant to cross the lake.  Magee Marsh State Wildlife Area, Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, and other nearby areas protect a few thousand acres of habitat, but the birds are most numerous in the small 7-acre area around the Magee Marsh boardwalk.  The Ohio Division of Wildlife built the famous mile-long boardwalk in 1989.  It is wide, has guiderails, and is wheelchair accessible.  It provides birders with a wonderful vantage point for viewing the birds and it protects the habitat from trampling.  The birds seem to feel safe and come very close to the boardwalk, even perching on it occasionally.

Sandy Beasley, my birding buddy from Georgia, and I arrived on the evening of May 13.  I had heard about Magee Marsh for years, but hesitated to visit because of the crowds.  Those fears were not justified.  The State of Ohio did an outstanding job making the site accessible to visitors.  The parking lots are large and well laid-out, there are a sufficient number of porta-potties and they are extremely well maintained.  And the wide boardwalk itself comfortably accommodates a large number of people.  Most importantly, I was surprised to discover that the other birders actually enhanced my experience.  People were friendly and readily shared information.  The only “traffic jam” that I encountered was when a Black-billed Cuckoo was sighted.  Once I said “life bird”, someone pushed me to the front of the crowd and gave detailed directions for finding the bird.  Birders of all levels and from all over the country come to Magee to enjoy the spectacle of spring migration.  I frequently encountered groups of people intently looking in a particular direction.  When I asked what they were watching, the answers varied from “Mourning Warbler” to “there’s a Robin down there” to “I don’t know what the others see”.  As an intermediate level birder, I had the fun of both being helped (such as confirmation of my life Philadelphia Vireo) as well as helping others with finding birds and identification.

Black-throated Green Warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

On our first amazing day at Magee, we enjoyed many close views of warblers.  One of my favorites was the Black-throated Green Warbler who flitted around just a few feet from me and even perched on the boardwalk rail for a moment.

Another crowd pleaser was this cooperative Blackburnian Warbler who also showed off for everyone close by.

Blackburnian Warbler

Blackburnian Warbler

The highlight of the day for both Sandy and me was a female Kirtland’s Warbler on the beach.  Kirtland’s Warbler is rare at Magee and cannot be expected every year, so we were thrilled to see it, a life bird for both of us.

The day ended with an American Woodcock alternately sleeping, preening, and posing for photos right next to the east end of the boardwalk.

Woodcock

American Woodcock

Our second day was equally wonderful and again we saw many beautiful warblers and other birds.  Several Baltimore Orioles brightened the scene and were easy to photograph thanks to the oranges that had been strategically placed for them.  We were also treated to another Kirtland’s Warbler, a male this time, identified as a first year bird by experienced birders.

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

Mid-afternoon Sandy went back to the hotel with Barbara, a birder we met who had driven 11 hours from Boston.  I birded a little longer and saw a Sora near the boardwalk.  Then, I, too, returned to the hotel for dinner with Sandy and Barbara to end another perfect day.

Sora

Sora

The following morning, Sandy, Barbara, and I decided to bird another area so we headed to Maumee Bay State Park.  Maumee Bay has an even longer boardwalk than Magee – 2 miles!  It was quieter than Magee had been, but we enjoyed a pleasant day and the simple pleasures of a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher on the nest, a Great Crested Flycatcher calling over the wetlands, Common Yellowthroats everywhere.  And we added a few birds to our trip list.

Purple Martins

A Purple Martin pair on the “front porch” of their house outside the Nature Center at Maumee Bay State Park.

Deer in the woods at Maumee Bay State Park

Deer in the woods at Maumee Bay State Park

On day four of the trip, we went back to Magee Marsh and saw almost no warblers in an hour’s birding.  The weather must have favored their continued journey north and had not brought in replacements.  We quickly changed plans and drove south towards Shawnee State Forest.  Magee Marsh had exceeded our expectations in every way.  Sandy and I both plan to visit “Disneyland for Birders” again.

Sandy and Shelley at Magee Marsh

Sandy and Shelley at Magee Marsh

I used the website Birding Magee Marsh for trip planning.  I wish that I had seen the info on Tips for reporting bird sightings at Magee Marsh Wildlife Area to eBird before the trip so that I could have kept better lists.  There is no general hot spot for “Magee Marsh” because it spans two counties.  For a detailed and interesting article about Magee Marsh by Kenn Kaufman, see Magee – Anatomy of a Migrant Hotspot.

Read Full Post »